Keeping It Queer

A genderqueer person of color trying to figure stuff out. Willing to share some of my thoughts but with no grand illusions that what I say helps anyone but me.
girljanitor:

youarenotyou:

mattreadsthings:

fagglet:

historicaltimes:

"Disability activists abandon their wheelchairs and mobility devices and crawl up the 83 stone steps of the U.S. Capital Building demanding the passage of the American with Disability Act, March 12, 1990."

fucking badass.

I feel like there is a trend where photos of monumental moments in civil and human rights are presented in black and white, which really distracts from the reality that this happened less than 25 years ago.
This is a fucking badass demonstration and to present fighting ableism as something that happened a long long time ago is really just not reality.

^^^^^

Yeah, I think that it presents this in a sort of “we’ve come so far since then” kind of light, when that’s just not true. For example, in 2009 ADAPT protested the lack of long-term care services in the health care reform legislation with a very similar protest/sit-in:





You can go to their website to view “Action Reports” with photos on in-person protests and other events, including very recent ones.

girljanitor:

youarenotyou:

mattreadsthings:

fagglet:

historicaltimes:

"Disability activists abandon their wheelchairs and mobility devices and crawl up the 83 stone steps of the U.S. Capital Building demanding the passage of the American with Disability Act, March 12, 1990."

fucking badass.

I feel like there is a trend where photos of monumental moments in civil and human rights are presented in black and white, which really distracts from the reality that this happened less than 25 years ago.

This is a fucking badass demonstration and to present fighting ableism as something that happened a long long time ago is really just not reality.

^^^^^

Yeah, I think that it presents this in a sort of “we’ve come so far since then” kind of light, when that’s just not true. For example, in 2009 ADAPT protested the lack of long-term care services in the health care reform legislation with a very similar protest/sit-in:

image

image

image

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You can go to their website to view “Action Reports” with photos on in-person protests and other events, including very recent ones.

(via kittiesinqueerland)

5 Tips To Support LGBTQ People with Disabilities

queerability:

1. Presume competence. This applies to people with physical and/or mental disabilities. Never assume that a disabled person isn’t cognizant of their surroundings.

2. Respect their autonomy. Always ask if a disabled person needs help. If they decline help, don’t force your…

paleotool:

Robin Wood

I’ve had to watch this about a dozen times and I’ve even posted it before.

Sign me up

maoshan:

Vincent van Gogh: Pollard willow - July 1882 (252). In a letter to Theo Van Gogh.

maoshan:

Vincent van Gogh: Pollard willow - July 1882 (252). In a letter to Theo Van Gogh.

(via inkstainedqueer)

I just feel like no matter what, prisons are bad for everybody. They aren’t just bad for trans people—they’re bad for all people. It wouldn’t be fair for me to make it seem like it was so hard for me, just as a trans women, because I’ve been around a lot of people who don’t deserve to be in prison at all. Prison is hard for everybody. We’ve all got our personal issues and have to do what we need to do to survive in there and be strong.

It’s not the right approach for people to sensationalize this story and say: You were a trans woman in a men’s prison. Because at the end of the day, all prisons are bad for all people—trans, cys, gay, straight, Black, white, Asian, brown, purple, polka-dotted, striped, zebra, alien or whatever.

Yes, I had my issues. I dealt with extra discrimination and extra scrutiny. I had to deal with things that other people wouldn’t have had to deal with in prison because I was a trans woman in a men’s prison. Of course, it was upsetting, and it was hard.

But I was blessed to have the support of a team that was willing to support me in this fight against the system. Not everyone in there had that—not everyone had support or someone to help them or be there for them, to protect them or understand them or get them in touch with the right resources. I was blessed to have that.

So yes, I can say how hard it was for me, but what about the people in prison who are there wrongfully or for petty charges or because of the criminalization of everything? There are men and women who have been in there for days, years, even decades—what about them?

You mean the generation that paid three times as much for college to enter a job market with triple the unemployment isn’t interested in purchasing the assets of the generation who just blew an enormous housing bubble and kept it from popping through quantitative easing and out-and-out federal support? Curious.

—When comments are better than the article, Atlantic edition (“The Cheapest Generation: Why Millennials aren’t buying cars or houses, and what that means for the economy”)

(Source: bostonreview, via paleotool)